Our Immense World

A great scholar explains how almost all the ideologies and the economic systems fail by focusing on inanimate factors, instead of virtues and the human being itself. He also claims that the only way to progress as humankind is to seek change in human behavior and to promote our moral duties on each other. His considerable thoughts are summed up in a semi-utopic (perhaps not utopic after all) world called “Our Immense World” (by someone else). Here are only some of the interesting points made:

In Our Immense World, actions that harm the individuals and society are not coercively prohibited. Instead, such irregularities are treated and cured gradually by progressive education, persuasion, and by the adoption of universal human and ethical values by every individual’s free will.

Our Immense World acknowledges humanity as one family consisting of various languages, religions, colors and socio-cultural properties and aims to provide a ground to unify such a family under an umbrella of peace despite all the differences. In such a world, diversities are treated as flowers that integrate a garden and are considered as a prerequisite means of knowing each other and job sharing to reconstruct the earth.

In Our Immense World, the communal structure presents more value than the economic structure. And the living examples of history prove that socially well-structured communities readily deal with problems that are risen by human nature and world conditions.

Our Immense World’s predominant trait is the fact that everyone there could freely speak their mind without anyone forcibly imposing an ideology. In a community in which believers can speak out their beliefs are summed and openly, justice would certainly prevail. Because under equal circumstances, the truth would overcome the erroneous and the light would surely clear the darkness.

In Our Immense World, women and men would be seen as two halves of a whole and the ones raised under the roof built by the warmth of family spirit will form the basis of a substantial society. The society formed by such individuals would serve a complete form of justice, cooperation, and solidarity. In Our Immense World, the whole humanity is perceived as a family and the world as one country.

In Our Immense World, vocations and talents are preserved from extreme and are directed towards integrity. The ruler and the slave are identified as equal under the Law and superiority is measured only on the basis of proximity to truth. In this world, governorship is merely seen as a responsibility and as a social service.

In Our Immense World, the happiness of the individual forms an indivisible unity with the society’s welfare, serenity, and happiness. Therefore, the individual that seeks his/her happiness in the society’s happiness alone ascends the level of a community or a nation.

Since everyone in Our Immense World strives to adjust their life according to these fundamental principles, austerity too ascertains its place and definition. With these principles, the person is emancipated from running after petty interests like a simple homoeconomicus and instead is molded into a being that has reached the most significant merit, God’s approval.

In Our Immense World, the concept of economy preserves its position as “incitements” that lead the person into a more virtuous being. Limitless consumption is replaced with frugality. A person is considered as a person, not in the measure of his/her expenses but as a person who builds humane merits via his/her economic activity, a person who bedecks his/her own self with justice, compassion, rightness, respect to another’s rights, solidarity and the ability to prefer others to one’s own self.

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